Skip to content

How to avoid work-from-home pitfalls

Work from home is a great convenience, but it can prevent people from reaching their goals if not careful.

Whether it's working for a small business owner, a franchise-based company or picking up some extra shifts from temporary positions, immigrants who send money to their families back home will go to great lengths to ensure that their loved ones are provided for. And thanks to the internet and telecommunication, many immigrants are taking advantage of these modern-day conveniences by working from home.

Today, more people than ever before are putting in full work days at the office, only from the comfort of their own homes. While distractions from one's residence may be too hard to overcome for some, others are able to thrive on their home turf. Not only do they get more done, but they're also able to get through with their day earlier than they would had they gone into the office, avoiding rush hour traffic and public transportation delays.

That said, there are some negatives of work-from-home jobs that can prevent individuals from advancing in their lines of work, whether it's being paid more or receiving a promotion, according to recent survey data.

Human resources and talent management firm Korn/Ferry International recently surveyed more than 300 company executives throughout the country, asking them about their businesses, their employees and their overall take on career mobility. One of the most noteworthy responses from these business execs was what they thought of working from home. In 60 percent of cases, employee managers said that they thought home-based workers risked limiting themselves with regards to career advancement.

Ana Dutra, Korn/Ferry Leadership and Talent Consulting CEO, indicated that people who take advantage of telecommunication need to be aware of the fact that company decision makers may unintentionally overlook them simply because they're not physically present.

"While working at home can be beneficial for both companies and workers, it can also lead to 'invisibility' that can limit opportunities for career advancement," said Dutra. "It is important for telecommuters to remain networked as closely as possible with peers and leaders in the office."

Human resource experts say that networking is much easier today than it has been historically, mainly because of the increased channels in which individuals can stay in touch with others. Social media websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, are one way to maintain contact with co-workers, but this should also include face-to-face communication. In other words, home-based workers should make it a priority to go into the office every now and then so that they can maintain a presence and stay connected.

Work-from-home myths
Because working from home has become so common, a number of inaccuracies and myths are out there that may be giving individuals the wrong impression of it. Nonprofit human resources association recently attempted to dispel some of these flawed beliefs.

For example, some people think that the typical individual who works from home are mothers who have children. While true, many parents do work from their home because it enables them to juggle work with family responsibilities, the average teleworker is a 40-year-old man with a college degree.

There's also the suggestion that home-based workers don't give as much effort as individuals who go into the office. The Scottsdale, Arizona-based HR firm indicates that the opposite is more accurate, as traditionally, working from home requires greater conscientiousness given the variety of distractions there can be that aren't in the office.

Read more from Other

Comments are closed.